I’m a big believer in using Camtasia for a variety of things.  If you aren’t familiar, Camtasia is, “A powerful, yet easy-to-use screen recorder, Camtasia helps you create professional videos without having to be a video pro.”  And while it sounds like I am really trying to sell you on Camtasia, I’m not.  It is just the screen recording software I have the most experience using and I like it – a lot.  It helps me do my job better and that is the crux of what today’s blog is about.

As a digital marketing agency, I find it useful in so many ways.  Typically at the end of every website project, I will create a custom training video that showcases how to make each and every change on the client’s new website.  This video provides the client three things:

  • Training they can watch when their time allows.
  • A historical record of how to use their new website.
    • This is especially useful as companies often have people coming and going. Having a recorded training video means when people leave, the only organizational knowledge of making website updates doesn’t leave with them.
  • An inexpensive training method.
    • So many agencies want to do on-site training (which is time consuming and expensive). Sometimes these costs are not listed as a separate line item but are a big reason a new website costs $30k+.  Or worse, only very limited training is included because the agency wants to make all of the changes for your company, no matter how easy, while billing you at an hourly rate.

camtasia-scrn-cap1-580-100022129-largeBesides training, it is also useful for education.  One of the things I have done in the past and plan to continue to do is digital marketing tips and tricks videos.  From Google Webmaster Tools education videos to webinars, Camtasia makes things easy.

Finally, as a proposal-sender, I have decided to begin trying something new in 2015.  Instead of simply sending along a 6 page project proposal, I create a 3-5 minute video reviewing the proposal and send it along as well.  It gives me the opportunity to:

  • Inform the prospect of the thought process for including certain items.
  • Sum up the proposal without making them read each and every word.
  • Get in front of the prospect, at least virtually, one more time.

In most cases, I would prefer to have a phone call to review a proposal.  However, my prospects are busy and I want to be very sensitive to their time commitments.  A video gives me the opportunity to review a proposal without making them carve out even more time from their busy days for me.

If you are in a business that has a need to educate, train, or sell to a prospect or client, you may want to think about using a screen recording software.  And if you, like me, aren’t a video editing genius, Camtasia seems to be as easy as they come.